Friday, November 21, 2014

Act As If


Act As If: Stumbling Through Hollywood with Headshot in Hand is now a book! Based on my long-running column for NowCasting.com, which is itself based on my 30-year acting career, this is the book for the actor in your life, aspiring or pro. Some blurbs: 

"…all graduating MFA students who want to make a living in 'The Biz' should be handed this book with their diploma, to give them a realistic view of the business they want to pursue. It's an honest, practical and remarkably uncynical look at the job of being an actor."
            Rick Hall, actor—Good Luck Charlie, 24, Curb Your Enthusiasm

"This book is a must for anyone thinking of taking Hollywood by storm. Petrea can point out common pitfalls while throwing in a dash of empowerment. It's your life, your career. Keep your eyes open and be sure to have this book on your nightstand."
            Liz Hanley (aka “Blanche”), Theatrical Agent, Bicoastal Talent

"I felt like I had a friend after reading this, someone who knows and expresses so eloquently the ups and downs and striving that an actor goes through on their artistic and career journey. It’s a delight, it’s fun, it’s comforting, and it’s real. Give it as a gift to yourself, or a fellow actor."
            Fran Montano, Artistic Director, The Actors Workout Studio

Act As If is officially in "soft launch." Everyone's already busy with the holidays, so I'll do an official launch (hard launch?) in the new year, with a contest and everything.

However! There will be a pre-launch on November 29th at Flintridge Bookstore and Coffeehouse, from 2-4 PM.

(This leaves room for a post-launch, a launch-launch, and a lunch-launch. Watch this space.)

Flintridge Bookstore is celebrating Small Business Saturday all day on the 29th, and you should come! It's a wonderful store with all the books you want, plus gorgeous gifts, AND coffee with treats. Easy to get to, at 1010 Foothill, and there's plenty of parking behind/under the store. Here's a chance to expand your literary horizons and check out Flintridge.

My Thanksgiving weekend is planned thusly:
Thanksgiving, which I will enjoy so quietly I'll be able to hear myself chew.
Black Friday, which I celebrate annually by hunkering down in the house with the curtains drawn.
Small Business Saturday, please see above.
(Apparently the western world still keeps Sundays open for church.)
Cyber Monday, when we're encouraged to shop online exactly like we do every other day, and when I will likely stay offline and write.
And Giving Tuesday—because after having spent the weekend acquiring, it's time to share what you have left, if anything, with the needy. I'll probably do that online.

Remember, books make great gifts!

Tuesday, November 18, 2014

The Altadena Farmers' Market Challenge

The challenge: to feed a family of four using only $25 at the Altadena Farmers' Market. Since we're a family of two, I thought, "no problem!" Not only was it not a problem, it was a pleasure to find good things to eat at the Market—enough to make us a meal with leftovers and then some.

A beautiful November day in Altadena.

We started with meat as the main dish. Novy Ranches had grass-fed beef fajita strips for $8.00 a pound. That's grass-fed, $8/pound. I can pay $6 for miscellaneous-fed hamburger at the grocery store.

The rest of the meal wasn't easy! There are too many temptations at the Altadena Farmers' Market. Here's something amazing I sampled at the Bread Lounge booth.

We also tasted several flavors of jam from Coldwater Canyon Provisions. I'm going back for more of this stuff.

There's honey, ice cream, vegetables, hummus, prepared foods (like prepared fresh right then and there) and much more. Yet the market is friendly, open, and doable. Not too big, and not mingy either. Just right.

I'd go back to the market for this booth alone.

We brought home a loaf of sesame/honey bread from the Bread Lounge, one green pepper for our fajitas, two organic avocados, three organic heirloom tomatoes, and a little over a pound of the Novy Ranch fajita strips.

We had some stuff on hand that needed to be used: one red pepper, fresh garlic, onions, some flour tortillas we hadn't eaten yet, and a container of pico de gallo. We thought we'd make fajitas and a tomato-avocado salad, and we'd toast the bread and have it with jam for dessert.

But avocados are one of my favorite foods, and I had that pico de gallo. I make lazy-butt guacamole by smashing my avocados and stirring in as much or as little pico de gallo as I want. You can add stuff like lime or garlic or salt or none, or all three.

I marinated the meat with spices, olive oil and Worcestershire Sauce. (There's a guy at the market who sells flavored olive oils, but we had already spent our $25 before we found him so he's another reason to go back.) By the way: not a hint of gristle in that meat.

The tomatoes lurked in the background. They don't belong in a fajita, and I didn't need them in my lazy-butt guac. I felt guilty about them, not sure what my "family of four" was going to do with them.

I sauteed the onion and fresh peppers in the same pan as the meat was cooked in, with some salt and pepper. I'm not giving you a recipe here, trust me, you're better off finding one on line and deciding how you want to use it.

The bread awaits its destiny.

Fajitas, lazy guacamole and random chips, plus a lime from our neighbor's tree. We ate our fill, it was delicious, and we didn't have room for bread for dessert. Hey, I never said I was some genius meal planner. But somehow, we always manage to get fed.

So the next day we had Bread Lounge bread for breakfast: toasted, buttered and jammed. Yum! For lunch we had left-over fajitas (they get jiggy in the fridge, in a good way), and we figured out what to do with our tomatoes. Duh! Sliced tomatoes with salt and pepper. You can't beat that.

Two and a half meals for us is more than a meal for four people, so the challenge to feed a family of four was no challenge at all. My math's not so good but I think we fed a family of four and a half.


Saturday, November 15, 2014

Girl Friday Book Club at Kidd's Jewelry Heist


Best event ever! I was invited to speak about Camelot & Vine with the Girl Friday Book Club. I knew it was going to be fun when I walked into Kidd's Jewelry Heist and saw this display.

Girl Friday Personal Assistant Services is just what it sounds like: a small, personal assistant company so loaded with creativity that I don't know where to begin. It wasn't just the food, or how artfully it was presented, or the wonderful people, or the venue. It was all these things and more.

And what a venue! Kidd's Jewelry Heist is charming for many reasons, not least of which is the decor, and most of which is owner Kelly Kidd himself. I wouldn't call him a shopkeeper, I'd call him a curator. He and his partner Redd Carter have created a cozy space where your imagination is invited to create whatever it wants to.

I grabbed a few photos of the place before the people came. 


 


Then I forgot about photos for a while. We met new people, drank wine, ate hand-crafted candies, and talked about anything and everything. When it came to talking about Camelot & Vine, I found a good-sized group of engaged and interesting women, great questions, and acceptance. Maybe it was the wine. If so, that was some amazing wine.


After book talk, we picked out our favorite charms and made "medieval" bracelets! That's (L-R) Rebecca, Karie, Kat Ward from Hometown Pasadena, author Pam Tartaglio, co-hostess and creative talent Ellen Main, Kelly, and Redd.

Cindi Knight orchestrates it all. The business is her brain-child, and from what I can tell she's got a hell of a brain.


I regret that I didn't get a decent picture of Cindi, who created Girl Friday Personal Assistant Services and who organizes these book club events. But I got a good picture of Kelly (above), and he got one of me (below).

Many thanks to our hosts Cindi, Ellen, Kelly and Redd, and to everyone who came. I had a fantastic time and I hope you did, too.

Update 11/18:
Tada! Here's the bracelet Kelly and Redd helped me make:
photo by John Sandel
You can see my little dragon and my crown and my fuzzy thing. On the underbeneath side I have a feather and a pail, both made of the same material as the crown and dragon.

Wednesday, November 12, 2014

Guest Author: John Vorhaus

Guest author John Vorhaus has visited here before. The guy's prolific, with six novels to his name and a plethora of other books besides. Here, a sample of John's eloquence:

 
The Search for Purpose is the Purpose

Having just finished writing my latest novel, Poole’s Paradise, an Imperfect Search for Purpose, I now find that writing a novel can be like carving a sculpture. You start with too much and keep chipping away – “squeezing out the stupid” as I called it – until what’s left can be called an artistic, as opposed to literary, work. See, the big difference between writers and artists is that writers expect to get edited. We let agents and editors stand in judgment of our work, and make changes according to their notes. Artists don’t get notes. They sculpt until the sculpting is done, then they put down their tools. I understand that writing and art are not the same – not the same process, not always the same intent – but I think that writers would be better off if they trusted their vision more. Poole’s Paradise, ferociously sculpted and rigorously self-edited, has taught me to trust mine.

Because here’s the thing: When you decide that no one will make your choices but you, you take on a responsibility to be clear-eyed and very demanding of your own work. I hated Poole’s Paradise for 14 of the 15 months it took to write, but I kept getting rid of what didn’t work and ultimately came to love what was left. I found the sculpture inside the stone, then I put down my tools.

And picked up other ones. Now I’m marketing the work, and I hate that part of the process like a cat hates baths. But what are you going to do? Since I write “artisanal novels,” it’s hard to get heard above the din of social media, and it’s up to no one but me to put energy into making that happen. Frankly, I’d rather be writing, but the reality for most novelists in our time is that we have to do it ourselves.

So then, one might wonder, why do it all? The answer is “legacy,” an issue of no small concern to every writer I know. We only have these few frail years of our lifespans in which to make our mark, and we have no way of knowing which part of our mark will last. My plan is to download as much as I can from the ephemeral vessel of my brain into the slightly less ephemeral vessels of the page or the e-page, for the simple reason that if my thoughts die inside my brain, they do no one any damn good. If it sounds like I’m thinking about “higher purpose,” I guess I am. I believe that each of us is a steward to our DNA, and that our job in this life is to honor that stewardship as we see fit. Sharing my wisdom in ways that help people’s lives rise is how I fulfil my stewardship. This makes me in no way special – everyone has wisdom and everyone can share it if they choose.

So here’s the wisdom of Poole’s Paradise as I understand it: Purpose comes when it comes. If you feel like you haven’t found yours, that’s totally okay, because while you’re searching for purpose, the search for purpose is your purpose. If you find that idea resonant, I think you’ll really enjoy Poole’s Paradise. And if you do, then I can put down my tools proudly and say, “My work here is done.”


Saturday, November 8, 2014

Namesake

This morning my neighbor did me the great honor of naming one of her butterflies after me. J owns a small butterfly pavilion,and is doing her part to regularly bring new butterflies into the world.

This is not Petrea, however. Petrea is shy and retiring, doesn't like to have her picture taken. This is Tickle, who enjoys a lift on your palm so much that it's hard to get her to dismount. I also got to meet Katy Perry, who is as pretty and showy as you'd expect.

I never thought I'd witness a miracle this morning, but I got to watch Stretchy Junior Junior emerge from his chrysalis. J has probably released all these lovelies by now, and I expect to see Stretchy JJ, Katy P, Tickle, and even Petrea flitting about the neighborhood at any moment. It doesn't matter to them if I remember their names, but at least one of them will stay with me for a long time.

Tuesday, November 4, 2014

An Intimate Heist

Kidd's Jewelry Heist in South Pasadena is a cache of trinkets and treasures, surrounded by Victorian finery and cozy divans. It's the perfect place for an intimate party. And that's just what we're going to have on November 14th with the Girl Friday Book Club.

There's a lot of information on the flyer below, but basically what you need to know is:
  • While we enjoy dessert and wine, we'll talk about my book, Camelot & Vine. You don't have to read the book to come, but you can read it free if you've got a Kindle.
  • The leather necklace or bracelet you make, in keeping with the Dark Ages/Medieval theme of the book, is included in the price.
  • Kidd's is behind the Dinosaur Farm at 1510 Mission in South Pas. Parking is in the rear and you can enter from there.
  • RSVP to Girl Friday by this Friday, November 7th, and tell them you heard it from me, that your price is $30, not the $40 on the flyer.


Monday, November 3, 2014

Anniversary

Summer, 2000

Before we got married, John and I had a date to the Huntington Library and Gardens. We asked a stranger to take our photo under the grapevine gazebo in the Shakespeare garden. That day, I knew we were going to get married when we bought a Huntington membership together. We married November 3, 2001, in the back yard of our rented house in Altadena.

Whenever we go to the Huntington we ask a stranger to take our picture at the gazebo.

Us 'neath the gazebo in 2010.

Once more, beneath the gazebo at the Huntington this year, 2014. That grapevine has really aged.

Happy anniversary, sweetie. These thirteen years can only be bettered by those to come.

Saturday, November 1, 2014

Wilma's Holiday

Wilma behaved beautifully last night and didn't bark at any trick-or-treaters. After the festivities, I asked her how she was feeling.

"Bring me a lemon coke, child," she said. "Mama needs to rest."

Wednesday, October 29, 2014

Saturday, October 25, 2014

Editing Your Stories


How many stories do you have in your heart, waiting to be told?

What keeps you from telling them?

Sometimes you start to write and it gets too complicated and the characters don't do what you want them to do and the locations aren't clear and the timelines won't fit and you begin to lose track and you give up, because you can't onto the page what you see in your mind.

Sometimes you get that right. It's all in order and the characters behave. But there's something missing, a spark, a voice.

Sometimes you've got it all: a great story and a clear voice. But you don't know where the hell all that punctuation is supposed to go.

Every author needs an editor. I know this because I'm an editor. And a proofreader. And a story editor. I've edited two books and proofread countless other works. And I would never publish without the help of a professional who is not me. (Okay, maybe I'd publish a blog post.) But when I speak about getting an extra pair of eyes to look at my work, I'm speaking about professional eyes in someone else's head. Extra eyes on my own head would look too odd even for me.

So I've teamed up with my favorite editor and writing teacher, John Sandel, to provide editing services, from proofreading to structure to story editing. John is also signing up students for Script Kitchen, a class to help you structure and finish your full-length story, like a novel or screenplay. You can take Script Kitchen online or in person.

Take a look at our new Editing Services page and tell us what you think. What should we call it, for example? And if you've got a story in you that needs to come out, let us know how we can help you find your voice.

Friday, October 17, 2014

Ideas


It may feel like inspiration comes from nowhere. But I think we create it ourselves.

My father-in-law says "preparation, incubation, inspiration, implementation." To me this means research, thought, the aha moment and the jotting down.

Lately I've been doing the preparation and incubation part: I research a possibility, think about it, look it up in another place or think some other maybe-kind-of thought, come up against the wall that is my insecurity or my taste or perhaps my own good sense, then throw it all away and start over again at that nowhere place from which inspiration does not come. One is told to trust the process. Ha.

This morning I was visiting with friends and one of them said something that gave me that light bulb, that inspiration, that aha!

Now I know inspiration comes from my girlfriends.


*****

Come by the Buena Vista library in Burbank Saturday, 10/18 from 1-4 pm. Sign up to win a free copy of "Camelot & Vine" and say hi to 50 local authors. The information is here.

**********

Tuesday, October 14, 2014

October 18th in Altadena

Big doings in Altadena this weekend! What to do, what to do? Here are a couple of things not to miss. I'd say go to the rally first, then head off to Eliot School because:

Altadenish must vote Yes on Measure A November 4th—that is, if the Altadena Libraries are to survive. This Saturday there will be a rally at 9am. The rally will last about 20 minutes and from there volunteers are encouraged to go door-to-door in the neighborhoods around the Branch. I wish I had this on my ballot, but Pasadenamanians do not get to vote on this one.
More info at www.AltadenaAlliance.org.


An equally worthy cause needs your attention on the same day!
Pasadena Rotary's "Done In A Day" Move-In for Room 13 at Eliot School begins at 9am Saturday, too. Room 13 has outgrown its original studio and is moving to the south side of the campus. Enter the parking loto on Boston Street and lend a hand.

Eliot School's first Room 13

Volunteers are needed:
For cleaning, we need help sweeping and mopping floors, washing windows, (there is one wall which is basically all windows), and everything needs a good wipe-down. 
For building, we need people with carpentry skills to help build shelving and tables. Also to paint the furniture, gesso canvases, put up organizers and wall hooks, curtains.  
For sorting and setting up, we need lots of help organizing supplies into their various centers (painting, drawing, clay, fiber, printmaking, library, photo and digital arts), and furniture put into place. 

Not handy? How about some in-kind donations?
Room 13 needs fabrics, digital cameras, clay, paint, sketchbooks, beads, sewing machines, t-squares, turpentine, canvases new or used, oils, watercolors, acrylics, dressmaker forms, pins and needles, yarn, thread—anything you can make art with.

Please call Patricia Hurley to let us know how you can help. Share this with your company, family or friends. Phone (626) 590-1134 with questions or just show up. Thank you!


Saturday, October 11, 2014

Art Night II

Art Night Pasadena brings happy crowds to Pasadena's many art venues and last night that included the Central Library. It was a family-friendly event with local authors, artists, dancers and musicians and it was a huge success.

How often does my book get its picture taken with celebrities?

The Reiyukai Creative Recycling display was particularly striking. Their table was busy all evening, with kids making beautiful boxes and decorations out of milk cartons. They teach workshops! Contact them here.

Throughout the evening Terry Bailey was creating interactive books on her iPod with art and music along with the words. When Terry comes to your book group she brings her iPod and plays the book's music for you.

I'm constantly amazed by the high quality and sheer number of programs offered by our library system. Adults, kids, teens, Shakespeare lovers, manga lovers, you name it. I highly recommend you subscribe to their monthly newsletter and enjoy the free amazingness our libraries have to offer.

Monday, October 6, 2014

Art Night

Topiaries, by Christie Beniston, is part of Pasadena's Rotating Art Exhibition program
I took this photo in February of 2012. 
Bellis reports that the art is still there at the corner of Walnut and Catalina.


Do your Friday night plans include Art Night Pasadena? If not, you must cancel whatever you've got going on and get yourself some free art!

Have you ever wondered what they're doing up in them thar hills at the Art Center College of Design? Maybe you'd like to catch a dance performance, or a nostalgic video about the Robinson brothers, Jackie and Mack. How often do you get to go to the Norton Simon for free, or see beneath the foundations of Room 13? Or maybe you'd like to check out a newer gallery like the Off-Ramp.

Music, theater, dance, art, more and more. You can't possibly see it all but you can try, with the help of free shuttles between venues.

One stop I hope you'll make is at the Pasadena Central Library, where I'll be meeting and greeting visitors along with other authors, artists and well-known storybook characters as we celebrate 130 years of reading in Pasadena. There are so many great Art Night activities for kids and the library is one of them, with family fun activities; musical performances, craft making, comics creators and more.

If you're not too worn out, don't forget the Art Walk on Saturday, when you can stop by Vroman's and see Debbi Swanson Patrick's Telling Images in Art on the Stairwell, with a reception from 1-3 pm.

While you're at it, Altadena has an important vote coming up on November 4th. Please vote yes on Measure A and keep the Altadena Libraries going!

Wednesday, October 1, 2014

Freebies

Blog friends have been my online support through thick and thin. I think you've all read Camelot & Vine by now. You've certainly heard enough about it. But as the publication of Act As If approaches, I want to give you some chances to read Camelot & Vine or share it with a friend for free. I want you to take a chance on the book so you can find out you love it, because you will. And then you'll buy Act As If.

Through October 30th, Camelot & Vine is available exclusively through these Amazon channels:

Kindle Unlimited: This is Amazon's ebook service where you pay $9.99 a month and they give you access to over 700,000 titles, including Camelot & Vine. Kindle Unlimited is great for voracious readers who read more than one book a month. Members read all they want for a monthly fee. You also get to keep the book on your Kindle as long as you keep your subscription going.

Amazon Prime Lending Library: Members of Amazon Prime can borrow one free ebook every month. Camelot & Vine is available this way as well.

Kindle Owners Lending Library: Essentially the same as Amazon Prime Lending Library when it comes to ebooks. Either way you need a Kindle.

Camelot & Vine is also part of the Amazon Matchbook Program, where you buy the paperback and get the ebook for 99cents, and you don't have to be a member of anything. And remember, the holidays are coming! Books make excellent gifts!

I don't know if you can see the spine: my publishing company is called Boz Books.

I don't know why it seems fitting that my book should be next to the works of Burgess. It's not fitting at all, really.

Sunday, September 28, 2014

Be You

Two favorite quotes I've been trying to live by lately:

"I'd rather be respected than liked." - Gale Ann Hurd

and

"Better to be an asshole than a chicken-shit." - Sheldon Patinkin

Like many women of my generation, I was brought up to be "nice." It has taken me too many decades to realize that "nice" gets you nowhere. But "nice" can be an unconscious reaction.

There's nothing wrong with being kind, but there's a fine line between being nice and allowing one's self to be walked on. And this is a hard thing to learn. I've slammed the lid on my own Pandora's box of thoughts, words and needs so many times that people who know me often say, "What do you want, really? You have a right to say," while they try to drag it out of me.

To say "No thank you" is not the same as the more definitive "No," which in turn differs from "No way, you jerk," if the situation warrants.

Learning to say any variation of No is a process for me. Or Yes, for that matter. And I'm not the only one.

I like these old sidewalk stamps in Pasadena. I suppose they're only in the pre-WWII neighborhoods but don't quote me on that.


This one's post-war. You can quote me.

The hardest thing to be is yourself. At least that's true for me. And yourself changes, with breakthrough after breakthrough, throughout your life. "Breakthrough" sounds kind of glorious, but sometimes it's just plain hard work.

Being my best self is easy at home with my loved ones (none of whom are jerks, by the way). But out in the world, being myself means being honest as well as politic, and being glad of my achievements as well as my weaknesses. It means not hiding behind "nice."

Damn. I guess that means I'm a person.

Monday, September 22, 2014

Banned Books Week

Well, this is pathetic. I was so pleased with myself because Banned Books Week is here and I'm a big fan of banned books. But this pile of innocents is all I could find on my shelves. We still have boxes in the garage so there's hope for me yet.

You can google Banned Books and find list after list of them. It's shocking, I tell you! However, I'm coming clean. Even though I don't dare keep them on my shelves, I have read many of the books on this list:

1. The Great Gatsby, by F. Scott Fitzgerald
I am the only person who doesn't like this book. I just read it again, and I don't care about anyone in it.

2. The Catcher in the Rye, by J.D. Salinger
I am the only person who hasn't read this book. I want to.

3. The Grapes of Wrath, by John Steinbeck
I've read this. I'm sure I have. Or I saw the movie.

4. To Kill a Mockingbird, by Harper Lee
I just read this for the first time! I wish I could do that again. To read a book like this for the first time is like floating down a river and enjoying the scenery while a wise and powerful guide does the rowing.

5. The Color Purple, by Alice Walker
I read this when it first came out. Loved it. Saw the movie and loved it, too.

6. Ulysses, by James Joyce
Nobody has read this book. Everyone says they have. My father might have read it. He had a well-worn copy.

7. Beloved, by Toni Morrison
Loved it.

8. The Lord of the Flies, by William Golding
This one kind of freaked me out.

9. 1984, by George Orwell
This was already quaint when I read it in high school. At least I thought so at the time.

11. Lolita, by Vladmir Nabokov
Now we're seeing the first one on the list that perhaps should be kept out of the hands of children and pedophiles. If you don't fit into either of these categories, I suggest you sit back and let Nabokov row your boat.

12. Of Mice and Men, by John Steinbeck
What a gorgeous book. The play, when done well, is a thing of heartbreaking beauty. The last time I saw it was at Deaf West Theater and they were brilliant.

15. Catch-22, by Joseph Heller
I'm putting this on my list with Catcher in the Rye. Haven't read it. Want to.

etc.

16. Brave New World, by Aldous Huxley
17. Animal Farm, by George Orwell
18. The Sun Also Rises, by Ernest Hemingway
19. As I Lay Dying, by William Faulkner
20. A Farewell to Arms, by Ernest Hemingway
23. Their Eyes Were Watching God, by Zora Neale Hurston
24. Invisible Man, by Ralph Ellison
25. Song of Solomon, by Toni Morrison
26. Gone with the Wind, by Margaret Mitchell
27. Native Son, by Richard Wright
28. One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest, by Ken Kesey
29. Slaughterhouse-Five, by Kurt Vonnegut
30. For Whom the Bell Tolls, by Ernest Hemingway
33. The Call of the Wild, by Jack London
36. Go Tell it on the Mountain, by James Baldwin
38. All the King's Men, by Robert Penn Warren
40. The Lord of the Rings, by J.R.R. Tolkien
45. The Jungle, by Upton Sinclair
48. Lady Chatterley's Lover, by D.H. Lawrence
49. A Clockwork Orange, by Anthony Burgess
50. The Awakening, by Kate Chopin
53. In Cold Blood, by Truman Capote
55. The Satanic Verses, by Salman Rushdie
57. Sophie's Choice, by William Styron
64. Sons and Lovers, by D.H. Lawrence
66. Cat's Cradle, by Kurt Vonnegut
67. A Separate Peace, by John Knowles
73. Naked Lunch, by William S. Burroughs
74. Brideshead Revisited, by Evelyn Waugh
75. Women in Love, by D.H. Lawrence
80. The Naked and the Dead, by Norman Mailer
84. Tropic of Cancer, by Henry Miller
88. An American Tragedy, by Theodore Dreiser
97. Rabbit, Run, by John Updike

You see I could go on. I'm sure you could, too. Do you have favorites here? Are there books you'd like to ban? Should certain books be banned or not? Why or why not?

Thursday, September 18, 2014

Boz, One Year Gone


I've been thinking of today as a milestone, the day I'd stop grieving for Boz. I'm incorrect about this, of course. You don't just hit the one year mark and say, "OK! Done! Whew!"

In some ways I don't want to stop missing Boz. I'd feel guilty. Call me silly. And guilt is only part of it. I don't think I'm going to stop missing him no matter what.

Boz's all-time favorite thing was to run in water. It even beat treats and belly rubs. We took him to Hahamongna several times a week and he'd run up and down in the rivulets, biting the water and getting as muddy as he could.

The times we took him to the beach were just as joyous--more so for him, because the ocean stinks more than fresh run-off from mountain rain.

Boz wasn't always old.

We thought of walking at Hahamongna today and sprinkling some of Boz's ashes in the water to commemorate his time with us. But it's too hot to be outdoors, and anyway, there's no water there now. Maybe we'll take his ashes there in the spring. Only a little bit of them. Neither of us can part with the whole batch, the whole dog.

I don't know if we'll ever be able to let Wilma off her leash to run in the water. Wilma would love it and so would I; there's nothing like seeing a domestic animal running free. But her safety comes first.

John and I are dog people. We love dogs, love to be around them. I was eager to adopt Wilma and she's wonderful. But Boz will always be my sweetie. I wonder if all pet people are this way. Are you? You love them all, but there's that one, that special one, who will always be your love.

**********

Remember, the Pasadena Humane Society's Wiggle Waggle Walk is September 28th. You can sign up to walk or donate money at the PHS site, or do the same with my friend Paula Johnson's Rose City Sisters team (a.k.a. pack).